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What's your song of innocence?

Everybody who has been involved with making the album has been asked about his or her own particular Song of Innocence. We’d also love to hear about the songs which most excited and inspired you as a child. If you’d like to feature on our website and also receive a FREE BONUS TRACK please email us at hello(a)parismotel.co.uk with your story.

Amy May

Amy May: The whole album is obviously full of songs from my childhood, but there were so many more which still make me smile and a few that I’ve subsequently kicked myself for not having put on! I think the one that springs most readily to mind is ‘Missionary Man’ by the Eurythmics. My mum and I would listen to this at top volume, over the heavy rumble of her ancient Landrover, as she drove me to school every morning.

Amy May

Mike and Joe Smith, bass and drums: The Fleetwoods, Mr Blue. Our mum and dad used to listen to this old cassette in the car when we were little and whenever this song came on we used to sing every single word, including the trumpet line, BA DUM, DUM DUM. We got to play the song at the Paris Motel Valentines Day Extravaganza a few years back and fulfilled a childhood dream!

Amy May

Nat Chan: ‘I wanna be like you’ from Jungle Book. it was my first exposure to music – brilliantly arranged jazz. I must’ve been 5, living in Hong Kong. It got me into dancing too. Instant love!

Amy May

Margit van der Zwan, organ and piano: ‘Hendrik Haan’, Ja Zuster, Nee Zuster. It was a great favourite in my house. It’s about leaving the tap running and people from Amsterdam. I still sing it today, but sadly there aren’t many people who know the song so I sing it on my own.

Amy May

Ian Wilson, Clarinet and recorder:True Blue’, Madonna. My brother bought the cassette of the same name. Around the same time my family bought the board game ‘Cluedo’ and so now when I hear the song I have a vivid picture of the globular headed, conical bodied, true blue Mrs. Peacock and her partner in crime, Professor Plum – or was is Colonel Mustard with a spanner….?

Amy May

Hazel Correa, violin: Agadoo, Black Lace. I was brought up on Pontin’s Holiday Camps and every night we would go to the Crocodile Club with Captain Croc and the Bluecoats. I loved all the songs with actions, especially songs like The Birdie Song and The Time Warp, but my fave was Agadoo!

Amy May

Abigail Burrows, flute: Jason Donovan, ‘Too Many Broken Hearts’. It was the first single I bought. An obsession with Jason Donovan followed. I even used to kiss his photo every night before I went to sleep.

Amy May

Sam Aylward, violin: George Formby’s ‘Little Stick of Blackpool Rock’. Maybe I was obsessed with sweets, but this track immediately sprang to mind. It could have been anything by George Formby though – he was a genius!

Amy May

Marianne Haynes, violin: ‘My Father’, Judy Collins and ‘Wish you were here’ by Pink Floyd.  My father and I would listen to Judy Collins on the three-hour car journeys to see my violin teacher when I was little. I was introduced to Pink Floyd when I first heard Radiohead and I fell in love!

Amy May

Oakki Lau, viola: A Child is Born, Johnny Mathis.

Amy May

Verity Harding, ‘cello: anything by Jive Bunny and The Mastermixers. Genius! I listened to their album many, many times until my brother buried it in the garden.

Amy May

Rosie Langley, violin: ‘Ain’t she sweet’ (unknown).  My dad forced me to sing it as a child and we used to play it on an old record player.

Amy May

Tom Fry, double bass: Herbert the Hedgehog by Captain Beaky.

Amy May

Damon Burrows, double bass: theme tune from Miami Vice. We had it on 12 inch. Amazing.

Amy May

Polly Wiltshire, viola: Ain’t no mountain high enough. long family journeys with my sister Hattie and cousin Izzy, singing at the tops of our voices feeling on top of the world!

Amy May

Rhian Porter: Welsh folk songs. Me and my family and school friends used to listen to these songs as a part of our everyday culture. We would get together once a week and have an evening of playing it together and it’s a big part of my culture back home in Wales! Cymru am byth!

Amy May

John Cottle: The Beatles’ Nowhere Man. One of the only pop records my parents had and the imagery of that song conjured up a very vivid picture in my child’s brain! Love the whole album though.

Amy May

Gareth McLearnon, flute, alto flute: Boney M’s ‘Brown girl in the ring. We all joined in, singing in the car.

Amy May

Martin Lissola, violin: Anything by Abba! I grew up in the sticks in Sweden, so we always had very long car journeys and the only music we had in the car was Abba!

Amy May

Nozomi Cohen, viola: Simon and Garfunkel’s Feeling Groovy and Ace of Bass’ All that she wants. The first reminds me of childhood summer holidays in the car with my parents and me and my friends used to sing the latter along with the radio – so cool….!

Amy May

Fiona Leggat, viola Bicycle Race by Queen. I danced around the living room for hours to this, pretending to ride my bicycle.

Amy May

Wei Wei Fraser, viola/violin: The Splash Song. it reminds me of all the fun me and my brother and three sisters had when we were little.

Amy May

Ben Lee, violin: Peter Gabriel, Sledgehammer. What else could it be?!

Amy May

Julian West, cor anglais and oboe: Baby Love and My one and only love. The first was my parents’ song. They danced to it together on the night they met. My dad also sang ‘My one and only love’ to my mum when they were courting. I didn’t know this until my dad died and I found my mum listening to a recording of Johnny Mathis singing it and I asked her why she was crying and she told me. A sad, but also very beautiful memory.

Amy May

Molly Neilson, bassoon: You’re so vain. The album ‘No Secrets’ was the soundtrack to my household until I was about six.

Amy May

Nick Tucker, photographer: Ant Music by Adam and the Antz I was completely obsessed with Adam and the Antz when I was about nine or ten. If I couldn’t spend my pocket money on the albums, singles and 12” I’d spend it on just about any music magazine or teen magazine with even a passing reference to the band. My pre-pubescent bedroom was festooned with posters of Adam Ant. I eventually ran out of bedroom wall and they crept up and across to the ceiling. Looking back it seems sweet and troubling in equal parts. P.S. My English teacher taught him as Stuart Sturridge, my middle name is Adam and if you arrange my initials they spell ANT.

Amy May

John Page, production manager: Dire Straits’ ‘Brothers in Arms. and Peter Starsted’s ‘Where do you go to my lovely?’ I can picture being in the back of the car with my mum, sister and stepdad pulling up to a roundabout listening to Dire Straits and feeling very sad. The second made me think I’d fallen in love with the woman in the song, before I understood what it all meant.

Amy May

Clare Younis, recording assistant and tea-maker extraordinaire: Anything by Dire Straits. Money for nothing? All I remember is that it began with a howling sound. I decided (due to an obsession with foxes) that it was a fox. Whatever it was, I wasn’t allowed to dance to it. Might have scratched the vinyl. I had to dance to the clothes dryer.

Amy May

Alex Bone, photographer: You make me feel like dancing, Leo Sayer. I really don’t know how I came to play this, but I used to dance round the room to it with it on the record player.